Category: Uncategorized

Working in high temperatures

29 January 2019

There are no legal limits as to what temperatures workers can safely work in. But your employers has a duty of care to provide a safe environment. 

You also have rights with respect to this.

  • If workers have reasonable grounds, they can refuse unsafe work but need to be available for other work.
  • If you think you’re working conditions are unsafe, say so – this is best done collectively.
  • Contact your union if you need help: we can support you in raising the issue with your employer.

We can also advocate for solutions such as the following:

  • Air conditioning – people can hire air-conditioning units. If this is not practical, ask for a unit to be placed in a room, such as the cafeteria or staff-room, so people can go there and cool off.
  • Request extra cooling off breaks, in the airconditioned room – this has worked well in the past in hospital kitchens and in some factories.
  • There is work-gear, such as cooling vests, which are chilled in a fridge, and used to cool the body. Ask your boss about these. Clothing like heavy cotton overalls traps heat. Light cotton is good.
  • Ask for water fountains on-site: if that’s not possible, make sure you drink plenty of water.
  • Many people work outdoors – you could ask the boss to consider a change of hours so people work when it’s cooler.
  • People should not do heavy work in high temperatures: ask you boss if you can defer this work until the weather cools down again.
  • Remember hats, sunscreen and light protective clothing.
  • Longer-term, bargain for acceptable heating and cooling systems in your workplace.

“Absolute hero” Kristine Bartlett wins New Zealander of the Year!

E tū is thrilled for our equal pay hero, Kristine Bartlett who tonight was named New Zealander of the Year.

It’s a huge honour and richly deserved, says Yvette Taylor, E tū Equal Pay Coordinator, who was with Kristine at tonight’s event to announce the winner.

“Kristine picked up the fight for equal pay on behalf of her workmates and she’s travelled this road for many years, helping win pay equity principles through the courts and seeing that through to an historic settlement for care and support workers.

“She has been a huge role model for women fighting for pay equity.”

Yvette says Kristine is also a trail-blazer for working women everywhere, by showing the power of standing firm and fighting for something they believe in.

“Kristine is the first to say she didn’t win equal pay for care and support workers alone. She has always paid tribute to her union and the many women who stood with her.

“It is rare that a working woman like Kristine, paid near- minimum wage, takes the national stage, captures the national imagination and goes on to achieve this prestigious title.

“It says much about Kristine’s qualities – her determination, commitment and stamina, all dedicated to winning a better, fairer pay deal for working women.

“She has won a place in the hearts and minds of women, with the name Kristine Bartlett now synonymous with the fight for equal pay.”

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern described Kristine as an “absolute hero” when presenting the award. We wholeheartedly agree!

ENDS

For further information, contact:

Yvette Taylor E tū Equal Pay Coordinator, ph.  027 431 8486