Author: E tū

National Executive representatives announced

The results are in for the 2021 National Executive elections.

We’re delighted to welcome back two long-serving members of the E tū whānau.

Angelique Kerr – Central region representative

Angelique served as the central region representative on E tū’s National Executive for the last three terms, including chair of the Audit and Risk Committee.

She works as at New Zealand’s Parliamentary Service in executive support and as a researcher.

“I want to continue to focus on ensuring that our union invests more in not only recruiting more members, but also training and empowering our union members to be union leaders in their workplace and communities.

“Our goals as a union are still focussed on growth, reach and capability. We need to continue to grow our union, even during these challenging times.”

Nikki Twine – Southern region representative

Nikki served as the southern region representative on E tū’s National Executive last term. She has been an E tū delegate for 20 years and also sits on the E tū Aviation Industry Council.

Nikki works as cabin crew for Mt Cook Airline.

“I’m driven by a strong belief in fairness for ‘all’, always being approachable, level-headed, and committed to my various E tū roles.

“2020/21 has seen many of us having to rethink, re-evaluate, and restructure our future. Our union continually needs to do the same to stay relevant and modern for our current and future membership without losing focus on our purpose and values: integrity, manaakitanga, aspiration, respect, and accountability.”

Results for other National Executive positions

All other National Executive roles were re-elected unopposed.

North Island vice president

Gadiel Asiata

South Island vice president

Ray Pilley

Northern region representative

Mischelle Moriarty

Returning officer

Christopher Gordon

All workers deserve the right to decent work

E tū stands alongside unions around the globe on World Day for Decent Work and continues to advocate for the right of workers everywhere to decent work.

Our definition of decent work is simple: it’s about a decent income, having secure work, a quality working environment, and for workers to have a voice in the workplace.

Currently, E tū is developing a Decent Work Charter and is hosting a Decent Work Summit in 2022 for Auckland-based member leaders.

New Zealand Post worker Misty Fergusson attended one of E tū’s first Decent Work trainings and knows what Decent Work means to her.

“It’s things like Fair Pay Agreements and the Living Wage. That’s a really big one – if I was getting paid over the Living Wage for my job, I’d be so much better off. It wouldn’t be as much of a struggle as it is now.

“It’s about giving everyone a fair fighting chance,” Misty says.

Misty’s Decent Work training also looked at the idea of social insurance – a guaranteed income for people who are made redundant, set at a much more liveable level than the current basic benefit.

Social insurance would be a good last resort to help families while they look for other employment – especially better employment – after losing their job, she says.

“It would mean you had so many better options, instead of MSD just shoving you into the first job they can get you, expecting you to stick it out on the minimum wage.”

E tū organiser Amy Hansen says no worker should be left behind in the fight for decent work.

“There’s so many aspects of jobs today that still don’t meet our criteria, and the criteria of organisations such as the International Labour Organisation, for what decent work involves.

“From seeing workers earning the minimum wage instead of the Living Wage, the rise of insecure, contract work, workplaces that present health and safety risks, and industries where workers don’t have the right to collectively bargain or don’t have industry standards – the need for decent work is more important than ever.”

Amy says events such as the planned E tū Job Summit will help to spread the word about decent work.

“We want workers to understand what decent work is and be part of the fight to create a better work future for themselves, their whānau, and communities.

“Decent work should be the right of all workers in Aotearoa New Zealand.”

ENDS

E tū wāhine highlight domestic violence on Suffrage Day

As E tū women celebrate Suffrage Day in Aotearoa New Zealand, they also urge communities to remember the fight that’s still going for many women.

Research shows that during emergency situations such as the COVID-19 crisis, gender-based violence gets worse.

According to an online survey by researchers at the University of Otago, around nine percent of New Zealanders said they’d experienced some kind of family harm over the lockdown period last year.

E tū Women’s Committee Convenor Wheeti Haenga says the issue of family violence comes up often in committee meetings.

“We are hearing stories about women who have been affected by domestic violence, and there’s a real concern that during COVID, because we know this tends to get a lot worse.

“Every woman and child in Aotearoa should live in homes that are free from violence.”

Wheeti says the committee wants all women to know there is help out there, including places such as Women’s Refuge.

“There’s practical and genuine support – they’ll get you to a secure house, make sure you have fresh food, PJs for the kids, and petrol vouchers.”

Family Violence Leave is also available for up to 10 days, she says.

Wheeti says that despite the many issues that remain for women, she wants to recognise their mahi and strength during the COVID crisis.

“A shout out to our wonderful wāhine everywhere in Aotearoa New Zealand, including our Māori and Pasefika women – they’ve all done a brilliant job.

“Suffrage Day is about remembering all our wāhine and their individual struggle to secure their rights as a collective.”

Where to get help

Concerned about a child?

  • If you believe a child is in immediate danger, call the Police on 111.
  • For non-urgent cases where you suspect a child may be in an unsafe environment, call Oranga Tamariki on 0508 326 459 or email [email protected]
  • Child Matters: Full consultation service free of charge. Contact Child Matters National Services Manager Megan West on 022 547 7505 for more.

‘Just Transition’ plans needed for declining industries, union says

E tū is calling for transition plans for industries affected by the changing marketplace, in the wake of a proposed closure of a major printing plant.

Almost 60 workers are set to lose their jobs at the Christchurch branch of Ovato, a print distribution company that has seen demand for its South Island business badly affected by the COVID crisis.

Around 30 E tū members will be affected by the proposal, the outcome of which will be confirmed on Monday.

All of Ovato’s business will then move to its other plant based in Wiri, Auckland.

On hearing the news, E tū delegate Ken Gibson says: “Members are gutted but saw writing on the wall with the way the work was slowing down.

“We have people who’ve been here anywhere from 10 to 40 plus years.”

The company has sent all workers home for the rest of the day, as many are in shock after the proposal was announced.

Joe Gallagher, a negotiation specialist at E tū, says while the company is providing good redundancy terms and packages for union members, Just Transition plans for supply chain businesses like Ovato are essential.

“We need to see transition plans for whole industries – like printing – in the supply chain, so that we can all work together to get the best outcome for workers, as some industries wind down and others ramp up.

“This applies not only to industries impacted by marketplace changes, but also to those that we know will be affected by other major factors such as climate change.

“There’s also some urgency to this, as the impacts of the pandemic are hastening the decline of some industries faster than might have occurred otherwise.”

Joe says other businesses in the printing industry have also shown signs of struggle, and workers need to be involved in planning their working futures.

“As we see changing trends continuing to affect demand in this industry, we need to craft alternative work pathways for workers so they can take their skills into other areas or have the opportunity to retrain.

“As always, workers’ voices are a key part of any transition plan, and unions have a clear role to play in facilitating this.”

ENDS

For more information and comment:
Joe Gallagher, 027 591 0015

E tū: No nonsense from big business this lockdown

E tū says it won’t be sitting by if big corporates try to shirk their duty to pay workers their proper wages during the Alert Level 4 lockdown.

Last year, E tū was concerned by some major companies that accepted the Government’s wage subsidy but treated workers badly – cutting wages, making them use annual leave, and layoffs – and still turned a profit.

A worker from a large infrastructure company that was among those that claimed the most from the Government says so far there’s been no news of what’s happening with their pay this lockdown.

“It’s shaping up to be the same as last year. They are avoiding us – not getting in touch with workers,” he says.

The man says last year workers in his department initially agreed to a pay cut of around 20%, deeming it a reasonable request under the circumstances.

That was, until they found out the company intended to pay them 20% less – not of their normal, much higher, wage, but of an average base rate.

He says it amounted to about a 50% pay cut overall and the situation bred distrust: “People weren’t happy about it. There was a just the feeling of unfairness.”

Some workers have heavy financial commitments – such as supporting family overseas, paying for medical care, or are the sole providers in their families – and couldn’t afford to take such a huge cut in pay, he says.

E tū negotiation specialist Joe Gallagher says companies need to honour employment law and pay their workers as agreed in their collective agreements or individual employment contracts.

“Workers in Aotearoa New Zealand pulled us through this crisis last time, and a lot of the large companies that were ‘down and out’ went on to record big profits.

“We’re not going to tolerate workers not being paid what has been agreed to in their collective agreements.”

Joe says it’s unacceptable for companies to take advantage of the situation to get away with paying their workers less, leaving them dependent on legal measures to recoup what they should have been paid in the first place.

“Companies need to honour and respect employment law – do the right thing now and pay workers 100%.”

ENDS

For more information and comment:
Joe Gallagher, 027 591 0015

‘Do the right thing’ union says, after workers report reduced pay or annual leave requests

E tū says all employers in Aotearoa New Zealand must pay their workers 100% of their wages during the national lockdown period.

During the March 2020 lockdown and other elevated Alert Level periods, the union dealt with many cases where workers had to accept reduced pay or use their annual leave to get paid – even when employers were being supported by the Government’s wage subsidy.

E tū delegate Josephine Wiredu, a cleaner at Auckland’s City Council who normally works around 55 hours a week, was sent home from work on Tuesday night as the country prepared to go into lockdown.

She and her colleagues have been told not to come in during Alert Level 4, and don’t yet have any guarantees about whether they’ll receive their full wages during this time.

Josephine, who is paid at the Living Wage rate, says any drop in income would be a “big blow”.

“Our employer only paid the 80% last year during the second lockdown, as they were no longer eligible for the wage subsidy. But they paid this from their own pocket,” she says.

“They have applied for the wage subsidy again now, but we don’t know what will happen yet. At the same time, we still need to pay our bills no matter what, so the decision will affect our families.”

Another delegate and cleaner, who doesn’t wish to be named and also works at the council for a different contractor, says workers are fully entitled to be paid 100% of their wages.

“Nobody knew that lockdown would be happening again, and we don’t know how long it’s going to last. Lockdown doesn’t stop our rent or power money going out.

“We signed a contract with our employer, they must keep to it,” she says.

Last year, the cleaner, who usually works more than 60 hours a week, says she was forced to use savings when her income during lockdown dropped to around 70% of her usual pay.

She doesn’t know how her pay will be affected this time, but in her role as a supervisor, she’s already had to refuse a request from management asking her to get colleagues to sign a form agreeing to use their annual leave during this lockdown.

E tū organiser Yvette Taylor says the union is also hearing from members in similar situations: being asked to take leave or agree to reduced pay.

“It is unacceptable that, through no fault of their own, some workers are having to bear the financial brunt of the lockdown.

“For someone on low pay, not being paid their full wages causes a financial crisis, because there’s no money to spare week to week.

“A cut in pay means not being able to pay rents, keep the lights on, and pay for essentials for kids. Sometimes it also means taking on high interest debt just to get by.”

Yvette says employers need to value the work their workers are doing – many of whom will be providing essential services as soon as the country is out of Alert Level 4.

“As soon as the alert levels drop, many other essential workers will be expected to be straight back to work – workers like cleaners who will expected to give everything a deep clean, so the rest of us feel safe going back to public spaces.

“We should be valuing this work by ensuring they are paid 100%, not just turning the tap off and on during alert level changes.”

ENDS

For more information and comment:
Yvette Taylor, 027 585 6120

Your work rights at Alert Level 4

You will have heard about the new COVID-19 cases in our community.

The Prime Minister has announced an Alert Level 4 lockdown, starting at 11.59pm last night for seven days in Auckland and Coromandel, and for three days everywhere else.

It is extremely important that we comply with official instructions. We know that Alert Level 4 means that we have to stay home to stay safe – click here to refresh your mind about the Alert Level 4 restrictions.

E tū has planned for any Alert Level increases. We are closely monitoring the latest developments and will make sure all E tū members are well informed and well represented as we get through this period.

In the meantime, here are some important things to keep in mind:

1. Do not sign any variations to your contract

Some employers may ask their workers to sign something that changes their employment conditions in response to Alert Level changes, such as agreeing to reduced pay. Do not sign this.

Instead, let them know that you will talk to your union first. Then contact your delegate, or E tū Support by emailing [email protected] or calling 0800 1 UNION (0800 186 466).

2. You may only work during Alert Level 4 if you are an essential worker

Many E tū members are essential workers – we thank them for their hard work during this period. The rest of us need to stay home and stay safe.

There is a limited list of essential businesses that are able to operate under Alert Level 4. Your employer should be in touch if you are required to work your normal shift. If not, stay home.

3. You should not have to lose any pay or have to use your leave during lockdown

E tū’s position is that your boss has to pay you for your normal hours of work while we are in lockdown. They should not require you to use any of your leave.

The Government has set up various programmes to help your employer meet their costs, such as as the wage subsidy.

4. The union is here to help with any employment issues you have

E tū Support will be open for calls and emails during normal hours, even at Alert Level 4.

Get in touch with us for any advice or representation you may need regarding anything happening at your workplace.

Contact E tū Support by emailing [email protected] or calling 0800 1 UNION (0800 186 466).

5. There are contingency plans for holding safe Biennial Membership Meetings online

You may be aware that our Biennial Membership Meetings (BMMs) are scheduled for September and October.

Although the current Alert Level increase does not affect any BMMs, we are prepared for the possibility than in-person meetings cannot go ahead.

We will communicate about this as we learn more, but we can be hopeful that BMMs may continue as scheduled.

6. Stay informed by following the official channels

The best and most accurate information about the COVID-19 response can always be found at www.covid19.govt.nz and by listening to the official announcements.

Look after your families and yourselves. Thank you for being an E tū member.

‘Just Transition’ plan essential as refinery closure vote passes

E tū strongly advocates for a Just Transition in the face of a shareholder vote in favour of closing the oil refinery to create an import-only terminal at Marsden Point.

Around 300 workers who are directly employed and several hundred contractors will likely lose their jobs or be affected when their workforce is downsized to just 60 workers, when the refinery becomes a storage facility for imported refined oil.

E tū organiser Annie Tothill says the situation at Marsden Point is similar to Taranaki and Tiwai and a Just Transition proposition is needed in this region.

“The vote by shareholders to close the refinery comes as a blow for a region where unemployment is already high. There’s also the flow-on effect to other local businesses and contractors, which will be significant.

“Marsden Point is facing the same issue as other towns built around manufacturing hubs, and there needs to be a plan to deal with any kind of transition,” she says.

Annie says the carbon footprint of importing refined oil, as well as the impact that closure will have on the country’s fuel security, are also important aspects to consider.

“If we are serious about securing a future for workers and our transition to a carbon-neutral society, then we absolutely need a Just Transition plan for Northland.

“It would require a commitment from shareholders, local and central Government to that transition plan, to manufacture alternative energies with a lower carbon footprint.”

Annie says local Government will also need to review the current resource consent as part of any future Just Transition proposal.

“The resource consent granted to Refining NZ in 2020 for a further 35 years does not seem to be in keeping with the goal of a carbon-neutral society.”

A final decision about the closure will be made by the board in September.

ENDS

For more information and comment:
Annie Tothill, 027 573 4934

Appointment of veteran unionist to Air NZ board “positive sign”

E tū, the largest union in Aotearoa New Zealand for aviation workers, welcomes Air New Zealand’s move to include a union voice in their latest round of board appointments.

The airline has appointed three new directors to its board, including veteran unionist Paul Goulter, who is currently the national secretary of New Zealand Educational Institute (NZEI) and has many years of experience in commercial and union leadership roles, including as a director of the Co-operative Bank.

E tū head of aviation, Savage, says the addition of a union voice to the airline’s board is a positive sign.

“It signals to us that Air New Zealand is looking to rebuild better as the aviation industry slowly recovers.

“Two-thirds of its employees are union members, so collective agreements are central to the company’s success,” Savage says.

“The airline cannot function without ongoing engagement with its unionised employees.”

Savage says Paul’s appointment will build on the work that fellow unionist Ross Wilson did in his role as an advisor to the board up until now.

“There’s no doubt that the many redundancies and how they were handled have strained the company’s relationship with members during the past year.

“However, E tū members have collectively told the company they want to have a say in the airline’s rebuild.

“They want to see a commitment from the company to being a better employer and creating decent jobs.”

ENDS

For more information and comment:
Savage, 027 590 0074