Author: E tū

Metals update

The employer advocate has finally signed off the Terms of Settlement for the Metals and Manufacturing MECA and the renewal document is being formatted.

The original parties’ campaign will kick off soon. Keep checking our website for updates and you can expect contact from your organiser soon regarding your ratification meetings.

As usual, the subsequent parties’ campaign will follow thereafter.

Celebrations mark Living Wage at Wreda

Wellington’s Mayor Justin Lester will today host an afternoon tea to celebrate the payment of the Living Wage of $21.15 to directly employed workers at Wreda (Wellington Regional Economic Development Agency).

More than half Wreda’s 250-plus workforce are set to benefit, including hosts/ushers, cleaners, operations staff and iSite workers.

Permanent staff moved to the 2018 Living Wage rate on 1 July and their pay will increase to the 2019 rate of $21.15 on 1 September, when casual workers will also receive the Living Wage.

The increases follow on-going campaigning with Living Wage Wellington that resulted in Wellington City Council becoming the first local body to be an accredited Living Wage Employer.

“This is another victory for Wellington workers and a step towards Wellington becoming a Living Wage city,” says Yvette Taylor, E tū’s Campaign Team Leader.

“Many of these workers were on the minimum wage or not much above, so this will be transformative for them, their families and communities. It means they can live with dignity and participate in the life of our wonderful city.

“They work in iconic venues like the Opera House and Michael Fowler Centre which are at the centre of our city’s cultural life, so all Wellingtonians have a stake in this.

“We would like to thank Wreda and Wellington City Council for coming to the table and making it happen.”

Wreda host, Liz Noone, who was an early advocate for the Living Wage at Wreda, says she’s delighted.

“For me it’s about doing what’s right, valuing your staff, appreciating what people do and making sure everyone is looked after,” Liz says.

The event coincides with the release of the 2019 Accredited New Zealand Living Wage Employers List which was unveiled in Dunedin at midday today.

ENDS

What: Afternoon tea to celebrate the Living Wage at Wreda

Where: Mayor’s reception room, Level 8, 113 The Terrace, Wellington

When: Monday, 2 September, 3pm

For further information, contact:

Yvette Taylor E tū Campaign Team Leader, ph. 027 585 6120

Workers will be available at the event to speak to media. You can check out this year’s Accredited Living Wage Employers List via this link: https://www.livingwage.org.nz/accreditedemployers

Big pay rises as Sanford workers ratify new pay deal

E tū members at Sanford Bluff are celebrating big pay rises after they voted unanimously to accept the company’s pay offer following wage bargaining last week.

The deal means 98% of Sanford Bluff workers will be earning the Living Wage or above, through a mix of higher wages as well as allowances.

Many workers were earning the minimum wage of $17.70. Including allowances, their pay will increase to the Living Wage of $21.15. Others will earn $22.36 an hour which is above the Living Wage.

The deal is backdated to 15 June. Workers who lost their jobs after restructuring at the plant will also receive backpay at the new rates up to their last day of employment.

“This is a fantastic victory for our members who have campaigned together with the Bluff community for the Living Wage for Bluff workers,” says Anna Huffstutler, E tū organiser and advocate.

“Sanford isn’t yet a Living Wage Employer so it’s not exactly where we want to be, but we have made a vital first step towards the Living Wage for our members and a significant move towards addressing low wages at Bluff,” she says.

Anna says the term is one year.

“That means we can come back next year and have a good shot at the Living Wage as a starting rate for all members.”

Sanford Bluff delegate, Linda Bevin says members are delighted with the pay increases.

However, she says Sanford is not yet an accredited Living Wage Employer, “so there is still work to do.”

ENDS

For more information, contact Anna Huffstutler E tū organiser and advocate ph. 027 209 7436

Anna will be able to provide members to speak for interested media.

Cloud Ocean job losses “disappointing” says E tū

E tū, the union at Cloud Ocean, says it met today with site management and its union delegates to discuss the company proposal to lay off 125 of the 160 strong work force.

E tū Industry Coordinator (Manufacturing & Food), Phil Knight says the company has been difficult to work with but it’s disappointing things have come to this.

“This is hard news for the workers, and we will be talking with our members about a response to the proposal, and doubtless seeking compensation for the loss of their jobs and income, as well as commitments around re-employment should the plant resume operations,” says Phil.

He says he’s hopeful most workers will find jobs in the event the plant shuts down.

“They’re good workers and any of the businesses crying out for people with a good work ethic and production skills would benefit from offering them employment.”

Phil says the union has no view on the controversy surrounding the company’s use of water from the local aquifer.

“The thing for us is whether they’ve been a fair and reasonable employer and contributed to the Christchurch economy, and the fact is they haven’t,” says Phil.

“These are permanent workers on pretty much minimum wages and conditions, and the work is precarious – they’ve faced constant changes of shift and shift cancellations at short notice.

“It’s had a high turnover because of the very poor conditions,” he says.

Phil says the company seems to have been disorganised from the start.

“There appears to have been little due diligence to ensure they had a market to supply, to as well as what’s required to run a business in New Zealand. They’ve been applying practices that may be commonplace in China but not acceptable in New Zealand.”

Phil says that includes constant breaches of health and safety, basic employment conditions and Holiday Act provisions.

Phil acknowledged few in Canterbury will be sad to hear the plant is likely to close.

“Besides wages, Cloud Ocean has contributed little to Christchurch, with materials including the plastic bottles, boxes and equipment all imported from overseas.

“But there is an opportunity to at least ensure any worker losing their job through this is treated right, and to look after staff properly if they do get production underway again.”

ENDS

For more information, contact:

Phil Knight E tū Industry Coordinator (Manufacturing & Food) ph. 027 591 0053

E tū urges NZTA to lift funding for VTNZ

E tū has written to Mark Ratcliffe, the Chief Executive of the New Zealand Transport Agency, urging the Agency to improve funding for VTNZ so its workers can be fairly paid.

VTNZ driving test and vehicle testing officials took strike action on Monday for 24 hours in protest over their pay.

The driving test officials earn between $21.00 and $22.50, which members say doesn’t reflect their skills and experience, nor the on the job hazards. Vehicle testing officials also earn below the industry standard.

E tū Lead Organiser, Dayna Townsend says driving test officials have been trying to improve their basic pay scale since 2014 when NZTA awarded the driver testing contract to VTNZ.

Before then, Dayna says the AA had the contract “and the starting rate for driving testers was higher then than the highest paid rate for them now. As well as the higher pay, they had allowances which also boosted their pay.

“Vehicle testers are also at the bottom of the mechanics scale.

“NZTA funding for VTNZ is too low to ensure these workers are fairly paid,” says Dayna.

“This is a huge problem for our members wherever services are contracted out to private companies. Typically, government agencies chose the lowest tender and it is workers who pay the price for that, through low pay.”

Dayna says NZTA has been asked to increase the funding for VTNZ so it can lift pay rates to a more realistic level.

“These are government workers, doing the government’s job of keeping people safe on the roads. They should be fairly paid and that means paying contractors enough to ensure that happens,” she says.

ENDS

For more information, contact:

Dayna Townsend E tū Lead Organiser ph. 027 590 0070

VTNZ workers to strike over low pay

VTNZ driving test and vehicle testing officials will take strike action for 24 hours on Monday 5 August, in protest over their poor pay.

The strike takes effect just after midnight (12.01am) tonight nationwide.  

E tū advocate, Sunny Sehgal says E tū’s VTNZ driver testing members are qualified professionals who do a dangerous job, but that’s not reflected in their wages.

“The pay is between $21.00 and $22.50 an hour, which may look good to some people, but it’s a skilful job. And it’s hazardous. They are in a car with people who may not be competent to drive,” he says.

Since 2014, VTNZ has been run by German company Dekra, which members say has consistently resisted improving their pay scales.   

E tū member, Harun Ali says he’s a trained and qualified professional who has to manage multiple risks on the job “but the pay doesn’t recognise that.

 “I have a passion for this job. It’s something I love to do, but it’s risky,” says Harun, who has 14 years of experience as a driver testing official.  

“Drivers are often poorly prepared. There are a lot of accidents and a lot of us are being hurt. We face people who come out of jail, who are very threatening.

“We’ve been chased around the cars, bullied and threatened. A lot of times we end up calling the cops.”

Sunny says VTNZ mechanics are also qualified tradesmen whose pay rates are well below the industry standard.

Mediation has failed to resolve the dispute, leaving members little choice but to walk off the job, he said.

“Members are only asking for a fair increase to their wages to properly value their work and to cover the growing costs of housing, fuel and food.”

ENDS

The members will be picketing on Monday morning.

Where: Sylvia Park VTNZ site, 5 Sylvia Park Road, Mount Wellington, Auckland

When: from 8am-midday.

For further information, contact:

Sunny Sehgal E tū organiser ph. 027 590 0075

We can provide contact details for Harun for interested media.

Union to consider industry training changes

The following statement by E tū National Secretary, Bill Newson is in response to the industry changes related to polytechnics and on the job training announced today.

“The changes proposed today are significant for working people.

“Industry training is important for working people as life-long employment and income security depends on the ability to continually develop skills at work and have those skills recognised across industry. Training at work while in employment – ‘earning while you learn’ – is important for working people especially those who can’t afford to rack up a big student debt.

“Today’s announcement is complex, the devil is in the detail and we will be reviewing the proposals carefully.  Providing an industry voice through Workforce Development Councils is good, as is the transitionary approach to change.  However, E tū’s concern is that on the job training is not compromised over time to shore up Polytechnic viability.  We will be taking the time to assess the changes carefully.”

An update for our Metals members

Following our last update (which you can check out on our website), your bargaining team met for another day of talks on 19 July.

The result was an agreement has been reached for a settlement, subject to ratification, for the renewal of the Metals and Manufacturing MECA for 2019.

The parties are still in discussion to finalise the wording of the new clauses required to meet the amendments to the Employment Relations Act and some new clauses as a result of members’ claims.

Members can look forward to full details of the proposed settlement, and notification of ratification meetings in the near future.

In the meantime, thank you all for your participation and support during the process.

Regards

Your bargaining team.

An update for our Metals members

Dear members,

Your bargaining team met for talks with Metals employers over the last three days – one day of claims and two days of bargaining.

The big issue for us this year is the rise in the minimum wage and the effect this has had on the relativities of paid rates for those covered by the Metals MECA.

There were valuable discussions around how to resolve this and now both parties have agreed on a common approach.

We have adjourned bargaining for the moment while we await the employers’ response on some issues.

There is another day set aside for bargaining on Friday, 19 July but discussions are continuing via video conference.

Regards,

Your bargaining team.